Box Death Hollow Wilderness in Utah

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Box-Death Hollow Wilderness

Box-Death Hollow Wilderness Area is a natural wonder of mesas, canyons and plateaus within the Dixie National Park, Utah which covers 25,751 acres with numerous monoclines. Read More

  • Box Death Hollow Wilderness covers an area of 25,751 acres
  • The Box is a steep monocline, divided by Pine Creek and Death Hollow Creek, tributaries of the Escalante River
  • There are no developed hiking trails and swimming through water may be required
  • Blue Spruce Campground is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day

Overview

Box Death Hollow Wilderness is one of Utah’s many breathtaking natural wonders, known for its orange-gray Navajo sandstone and limestone canyons. The park is divided by two tributaries of the Escalante River. "The Box" is a steep monocline, divided by Pine Creek which runs in a north-south direction. To the east is a gentler monocline that leads to the Death Hollow Creek.

Location and Information

Travel north about 15 miles from Escalante, Utah along Pine Creek Road into the Dixie National Forest. Access Death Hollow from Hell’s Backbone Road.

Contact: Escalante Ranger District at 435-826-5400

Entrance Fees/Hours

No fees. Open all year round, weather permitting.

Camping: Blue Spruce Campground

  • 17 miles North of Escalante, Off Hell’s Backbone Road along Forest Service Road 145
  • 6 sites, Accommodates RVs up to 18 feet
  • Restrooms and drinking water, no garbage pickup
  • Open Memorial Day to Labor Day
  • Small fee

Fishing

Brown and rainbow trout are abundant in Pine Creek and Sand Creek.

Wildlife Viewing

The area is inhabited by mule deer, elk, cougar, mountain lion, golden eagle and American kestrel. Rare species of Lewis woodpecker, western bluebird and mountain bluebird may also be seen.

Hiking Trails

There are no developed trails in Box Death Hollow Wilderness. Hiking access is through the Phipps-Death Hollow Outstanding Natural Area adjacent to Box Hollow.

  • Pine Creek - Access into the Box is via Pine Creek from the Blue Spruce campground along a 9-mile route. Wading or swimming may be necessary at times.
  • Death Hollow - It is possible to hike along Death Hollow from Hell’s Backbone Bridge off Forest Road 153.

Fun Facts

A monocline is where fault lines cause the earth to rise and fall sharply.

Death Hollow Creek was named after the livestock that plunged to their death trying to navigate the steep canyon.