Bryce Canyon Hoodoos

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Hoodoos

Imagine for a minute towering, weather worn, almost gothic style spires rising up from a Utah canyon, and one can clearly picture the beauty of Bryce Canyon National Park's hoodoos.

  • Hoodoos are formed by weathering over millions of years 
  • Best places to see Bryce hoodoos are Fairyland Point, Sunrise Point, Sunset Point & Bryce Point 
  • The Navajo Loop Trail and the Queens Garden Trail offer the chance to see many hoodoos close up

Overview

Hoodoos are the spires of rock which characterize Bryce Canyon, rising like totem poles in variable thicknesses and shapes, depending upon how nature has weathered the hard and soft layers of sedimentary rock. Bryce hoodoos vary in size from an average human to a ten-story building.

The best place to see hoodoos is at Fairyland Point, Sunrise Point, Sunset Point, Bryce Point, Agua Canyon and Rainbow and Yovimpa Points.

How Hoodoos are Formed

The Paunsaugunt plateau rocks are eroded by water seeping into niches, freezing and open up the cracks. The carbonic acid in rainwater also dissolves the limestone over time, creating arches and windows which then collapse leaving unique hoodoos.

Location of Famous Hoodoos

  • Thor's Hammer – Navajo Trail
  • Tower Bridge – Fairyland Trail
  • Queen Victoria – Queen's Garden Trail
  • The Chessman – Sunset Point to Sunrise Point Trail
  • Wall of Windows – Queen's Garden/Peekaboo Loop from Bryce Point
  • The Rabbit/The Backpacker – Agua Canyon
  • Three Wise Men - Queen's Garden/Peekaboo Loop from Bryce Point

Fun Facts

Hoodoos are particularly bright after rain, or when snow is on the ground, contrasting sharply with the red rock.

Hiking to see Hoodoos

The Navajo Loop trail and the Queens Garden Trail offer the chance to see many Bryce Canyon hoodoos close up on the 2.9 mile loop.